Replacing valve cover gasket - Toyota Celica Forum
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#1 (permalink) Old 11-10-2004, 03:54 AM
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I have a 91' Celica GT which means i have a 5S-fe... in the autozone instructions here it says that "On 3S-FE engines, align the grommets as shown in the accompanying illustration to ensure proper sealing of the cylinder head cover."

then it shows this picture.. I dont really understand the illustration, and does this apply to me?

 
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#2 (permalink) Old 11-10-2004, 06:40 AM
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pretty much you are going to take the bolts off as shown in the pics. remove the valve cover take the old gasket off make sure its all cleaned off the head and valve cover. put new gasket on you should have 4 little round gaskets also to go around the spark plug holes replace them then tighten again you want to get a nice snug fit not to tight but not loose.
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#3 (permalink) Old 11-10-2004, 04:05 PM
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*torque wrench*
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#4 (permalink) Old 11-11-2004, 08:32 PM
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you dont need a torque wrench just make sure you follow the instructions. ie. make it snug then turn another 30 degrees, and also get some black silicone gasket maker and apply it in the corners where the half circle is on each side.
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#5 (permalink) Old 11-12-2004, 04:01 AM
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i like to do it the "most correct way"
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#6 (permalink) Old 12-04-2004, 10:36 PM
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well being as the toyota manual doesnt use a torque setting for it, they use the 30degree thing, im going to assume that that is the "most correct way"
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#7 (permalink) Old 12-05-2004, 10:12 AM
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I'm sure it's too late for DC5R, but for anyone else that is interested there is a torque spec for this. The Toyota manual (nice dealer close to me lets me check theirs!) states on page EM-178, par 7(d),

"Install the head cover with the four grommets and nuts. Uniformly tighten the nuts in several passes.

Torque: 230 kg-cm (17 ft-lb, 23 N.m)

HINT: Install the grommets so that its markings are as shown in the illustration."

The 30 degrees shown in the illustration means the mark on the grommet should be within that 30 degree area. Totally agree with Dan that the right way is to use a torque wrench, as The Toyota Bible calls for.
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#8 (permalink) Old 12-06-2004, 07:25 PM
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torque wrench is good for rod bolts, main bolts, head bolts, flywheel bolts. sometimes header bolts.
valve cover.... waste of time! its not needed. you dont go buy a torque wrench to tighten a valve cover. lol... its just not that specific. if it seals great if not then tighten a little more i have never had a problem doing a valve cover without a torque wrench. and i bet most techs out there dont use torque wrenches for valve covers too.
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#9 (permalink) Old 12-06-2004, 08:06 PM
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i use left-handed torque wrench to tightin my muffler bearings

just messin im not that dumb ...wait ..thats cool though thanks for the tips and all that still

Why do those that say it cant be done stand in the way of those that are doing it ?
cross counrty runners do it long and hard.

lifegaurds do it in the water.
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#10 (permalink) Old 12-07-2004, 12:55 PM
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I am not saying I would go out a buy a torque wrench JUST for this one fix. But I am saying that if you have a torque wrench and sockets that fit, use them. JHull, in your post above you state, "you want to get a nice snug fit not to tight but not loose." That sounds nice and easy, but what does it really mean?

Do you think the torque applied to the nut will be the same when those "instructions" are accomplished by a 200 lb football player, or a 110 lb long-blond haired gearhead cheerleader with long shapely legs in a very short skirt bending over the low Celica fender and ...wait, wait, that's a post for another forum...

And how about the tools used by the individuals. If the cheerleader uses a 3 ft breaker bar, and the football player uses his 6 inch tool, they may be applying the same torque when they both tighten to a "nice snug fit." You know, it's that whole Archimedes, "give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the world" thing. Now if the tools are reversed, I would bet large sums the torque applied by the cheerleader will be much less than that applied by the football player when both report a snug fit. Using a torque wrench ensures both are applying the same torque; it permits a quantifying of the qualitative term "snug fit."

JHull, from reading your other posts it's obvious that you have the experience to put the valve cover on and tighten it correctly without the use of a torque wrench. But from reading many other posts, I also know there are many others out there that have very little experience...just look for posts where individuals have broken bolts from over tightening them.

So the real point I was making in my previous post was there IS a correct torque for the item that IS in the Toyota manual, and a 30 degree turn of the wrench past snug isn't it. If I was a mechanic that had to produce results quickly to make a larger profit, I'm sure I would not use a torque wrench for non-critical items either. But since I am working on my son's car with him, and I'm trying to teach him to follow tech guidance, I will continue to use a torque wrench since I have one. And that's all I have to say about that.
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